Squanto - Friend of the Pilgrims

Squanto - Friend of the Pilgrims

Publisher: Scholastic
Author:
$5.97

When Squanto is a young boy living in his Indian village of Patuxet, he sees the ships of white men, and his parents warn him to stay away. Squanto is curious about the white men, and when they eventually land, Squanto befriends them in order to find out about what his mother has called their "strange magic." One of the men, Charles Robbins, takes an interest in Squanto and invites him to sail back to London and see the land of the white men. In London, Squanto proves to the people that he is not the savage that they think he is, even though he is forced to be a spectacle in an Indian show.

Although Squanto is happy in London, he longs to return to his people. He is fortunate enough to sail back to America with Captain John Smith, but is soon kidnapped by the evil Captain Hunt who makes a living selling Indians into slavery. Luckily for Squanto, his freedom is purchased by two kindly monks, and he returns once again to London. When at last Squanto is able to reach the shores of America again, he discovers that a terrible plague has wiped out his entire village and all the members of his tribe. He meets with the new inhabitants of his former land, the Pilgrims, and in the end, teaches them the ways of his tribe so that they may survive.

The selflessness of Squanto is a good starting point for a discussion about this pivotal time in American history, during which the Indians had to make room for the new, white culture. The story is simply, yet engagingly told, and will inspire many questions about the customs and lifestyles of two very different societies.

Paperback: 112 pages

Book Title Squanto - Friend of the Pilgrims
Publisher: Scholastic

When Squanto is a young boy living in his Indian village of Patuxet, he sees the ships of white men, and his parents warn him to stay away. Squanto is curious about the white men, and when they eventually land, Squanto befriends them in order to find out about what his mother has called their "strange magic." One of the men, Charles Robbins, takes an interest in Squanto and invites him to sail back to London and see the land of the white men. In London, Squanto proves to the people that he is not the savage that they think he is, even though he is forced to be a spectacle in an Indian show.

Although Squanto is happy in London, he longs to return to his people. He is fortunate enough to sail back to America with Captain John Smith, but is soon kidnapped by the evil Captain Hunt who makes a living selling Indians into slavery. Luckily for Squanto, his freedom is purchased by two kindly monks, and he returns once again to London. When at last Squanto is able to reach the shores of America again, he discovers that a terrible plague has wiped out his entire village and all the members of his tribe. He meets with the new inhabitants of his former land, the Pilgrims, and in the end, teaches them the ways of his tribe so that they may survive.

The selflessness of Squanto is a good starting point for a discussion about this pivotal time in American history, during which the Indians had to make room for the new, white culture. The story is simply, yet engagingly told, and will inspire many questions about the customs and lifestyles of two very different societies.

Paperback: 112 pages